Tag Archives: introverts

Ode to Introverts!

Here’s one for all my fellow introverts.
You know who you are… your silence precedes you.

 

Susan Cain, author of the excellent Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, at TED 2012 – a fascinating and necessary manifesto for the importance of solitude in innovation and creativity.

Watch the video below!

 

Illustration ode by Grant Snider -“We are the Introverts”

…and the retort

 

10 Myths About Introverts:

  • Myth #1 – Introverts don’t like to talk. This is not true. Introverts just don’t talk unless they have something to say. They hate small talk. Get an introvert talking about something they are interested in, and they won’t shut up for days.
  • Myth #2 – Introverts are shy. Shyness has nothing to do with being an Introvert. Introverts are not necessarily afraid of people. What they need is a reason to interact. They don’t interact for the sake of interacting. If you want to talk to an Introvert, just start talking. Don’t worry about being polite.
  • Myth #3 – Introverts are rude. Introverts often don’t see a reason for beating around the bush with social pleasantries. They want everyone to just be real and honest. Unfortunately, this is not acceptable in most settings, so Introverts can feel a lot of pressure to fit in, which they find exhausting.
  • Myth #4 – Introverts don’t like people. On the contrary, Introverts intensely value the few friends they have. They can count their close friends on one hand. If you are lucky enough for an introvert to consider you a friend, you probably have a loyal ally for life. Once you have earned their respect as being a person of substance, you’re in.
  • Myth #5 – Introverts don’t like to go out in public. Nonsense. Introverts just don’t like to go out in public FOR AS LONG. They also like to avoid the complications that are involved in public activities. They take in data and experiences very quickly, and as a result, don’t need to be there for long to “get it.” They’re ready to go home, recharge, and process it all. In fact, recharging is absolutely crucial for Introverts.
  • Myth #6 – Introverts always want to be alone. Introverts are perfectly comfortable with their own thoughts. They think a lot. They daydream. They like to have problems to work on, puzzles to solve. But they can also get incredibly lonely if they don’t have anyone to share their discoveries with. They crave an authentic and sincere connection with ONE PERSON at a time.
  • Myth #7 – Introverts are weird. Introverts are often individualists. They don’t follow the crowd. They’d prefer to be valued for their novel ways of living. They think for themselves and because of that, they often challenge the norm. They don’t make most decisions based on what is popular or trendy.
  • Myth #8 – Introverts are aloof nerds. Introverts are people who primarily look inward, paying close attention to their thoughts and emotions. It’s not that they are incapable of paying attention to what is going on around them, it’s just that their inner world is much more stimulating and rewarding to them.
  • Myth #9 – Introverts don’t know how to relax and have fun. Introverts typically relax at home or in nature, not in busy public places. Introverts are not thrill seekers and adrenaline junkies. If there is too much talking and noise going on, they shut down. Their brains are too sensitive to the neurotransmitter called Dopamine. Introverts and Extroverts have different dominant neuro-pathways. Just look it up.
  • Myth #10 – Introverts can fix themselves and become Extroverts. A world without Introverts would be a world with few scientists, musicians, artists, poets, filmmakers, doctors, mathematicians, writers, and philosophers. That being said, there are still plenty of techniques an Extrovert can learn in order to interact with Introverts. (Yes, I reversed these two terms on purpose to show you how biased our society is.) Introverts cannot “fix themselves” and deserve respect for their natural temperament and contributions to the human race. In fact, one study (Silverman, 1986) showed that the percentage of Introverts increases with IQ

From: http://www.evercurious.com/2011/06/21/the-truth-about-introverts/

http://www.empowernetwork.com/kevinhennessy/files/2012/09/introvert.jpg

http://en.paperblog.com/the-power-of-introverts-155672/

via: http://elibishop.com/2011/07/27/10-myths-about-introverts/

From: someecards.com

introverts

Tagged , , , ,

How to Care For Introverts & Extroverts: Suggestions

“Given the amazing spread of that “Care for Introverts” image I posted across Tumblr, I had to think about the fact that so many folks seemed to identify with what was said there. As someone who is basically extroverted (with some decidedly introvert quirks) it occurred to me that the flipside of introversion seems self-evident because outgoing, extroverted people kind of demand you figure out how to deal with them as you go along. Still, I figured it couldn’t hurt to make a few notes in the style of “How To Care For Introverts” for the other half of this particular human interaction equation…

  • Respect their need to share, to ‘talk it out.’ They get their energy from other people.
  • Just as with introverts, never embarrass them in public. If you do embarrass them in public, go along as much as is reasonable if they play it off like a joke.
  • Don’t be surprised if they dive into a new situation headfirst. Don’t freak out either if they flounder a little. They’ll find their way.
  • Extroverts blurt. It’s the nature of the beast. Most try to leaven it with charm, but try to be patient when they don’t.
  • Expect interruptions that may seem rude, to some. Most of the time, they mean well.
  • Build surprise into your lives together. Most extroverts love the thrill of not knowing what’s up – as long as it’s positive.
  • Be prepared for what looks like ADD. The organically outgoing among us feed off the environment around them. They are often the best multi-taskers around, so understand that they are often paying much more attention to you than you think they are.
  • A flashover temper goes with the extroverted personality. The bad thing is it can look like a much more severe storm than it is. The good thing is it’s over quickly.
  • Many extroverts live for the intuitive leap. They reach for it. If teaching an extrovert something new, have patience with them jumping ahead of you.
  • They will always have lots of friends. But most extroverts have a core of best friends, and their loyalty can be fierce and aggressive if they feel the need to defend those friends. As with so many aspects of the extroverted personality, you may have to be patient with this.
  • They love compliments, but can usually see right through insincere flattery. Well-timed encouragement, though, can help an extrovert soar.
  • Sometimes, it’s okay to just go along with the “show.” Consider it free entertainment.
  • Respect their extroversion. Don’t try to pin them to your board or cage them. And do them a favor, if you are not yourself outgoing, extroverted – gently but persistently remind them to read something like this as often as possible. They probably will need the reminders.”
  • ****************

As a self-identified INTROVERT, I feel it is quite important to raise awareness of what this orientation towards life means. There are literally physiological and chemical differences in the ways that introverts and extroverts process information. We may be the minority, but there is nothing wrong with introverts! We are just different. So be informed. It might really help you communicate with and understand others  and/or yourself better.

More articles on introverts:


http://briankim.net/blog/2007/10/top-5-things-every-extrovert-should-know-about-introverts/

“Introverts tend to be those who are more energized when alone with themselves. They are the ones who have to be dragged to parties, who are the first ones ready to leave after a short period of time, and who generally enjoy solitary activities such as reading, writing, and daydreaming.”

 

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2003/03/caring-for-your-introvert/2696/

“I’m okay, you’re okay—in small doses.”
“Don’t you know that four fifths of all our troubles in this life would disappear if we would just sit down and keep still?”
“If you don’t say anything, you won’t be called on to repeat it.”
“I’m an introvert. You are a wonderful person and I like you. But now please shush.”

 

Tagged ,
%d bloggers like this: